The work is a voice for all the people

The novel Persepolis is written by Marjane Satrapi and published in 2000. This graphic memoir in black and white reflects Satrapi’s childhood years in Iran during and after the Islamic Revolution of 1979; the overthrow of the Shah regime and the destructive effects of war with Iraq. In the novel, several aspects reflect the marginalised status of women in Iran like the mandatory wearing of a veil and the inadequate education system. Satrapi’s work is a voice for all the people who are and were oppressed. In the graphic novel Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi shows how Muslims including women, children and secularists were marginalized, excluded and silenced during the Islamic Revolution in Iran.As Marjane grew up as a female Muslim during the Islamic Revolution in Iran, she repeatedly explores the theme of oppression in Persepolis to show the seriousness of the situation during that time. She does this through black and white drawings whereby black stands for the evil regime and white for the good secular modernists. From the very beginning of the graphic novel, one can see Marjane being depressed because she and all the other girls had to wear a veil. According to the traditional Islamic belief the proper dress code for women is clothing which covers the body from head to ankles and this includes veiling. The wearing of a veil imprisons the self-identity of women; erasing their individuality. As can be seen in the second drawing, Marjane and her classmates all look the same as they are covered and expressionless without self-identity. With this Satrapi wanted to point out that even innocent children suffer a lot from the strict regime in order to show how oppressive the Iranian regime was. In chapter ‘The Trip’, one of the religious fundamentalists stated, ‘Women’s hair emanates rays that excite men. That’s why women should cover their hair! If in fact it is really more civilized to go without veil, then animals are more civilized than we are’. This again shows that female Muslims were marginalized in Iran during the Islamic Revolution because it narrowed down their freedom; women have to change by wearing a veil otherwise it would distract men. In conclusion, the veil becomes a symbol of oppression which had a great impact on Satrapi’s and loads of other women’s life. Furthermore, the author shows how children are marginalized by the drastic change in the educational system in Iran during the Cultural Revolution of 1979. This can be seen on the second page of the novel when the regime stated: ‘All the bilingual schools must be closed down. They are symbols of capitalism. Of decadence.’ One of the pictures on that specific page shows us that girls are being separated from their guy friends. Also in the chapter ‘The Trip’ can be read that the ministry of the government has occupied the U.S. embassy and shut down the universities by saying: ‘The educational system and what is written in school books, at all levels, are decadent. Everything needs to be revised to ensure that our children are not led astray from the true path of Islam.’ and ‘Better to have no students at all than to educate future imperialists.’ They close the universities so that the curriculum can be changed to religious teachings rather than Western thought or science. By doing this, two of Marjane’s dreams went up in smoke: to visit the United States of America and to study chemistry and be like Marie Curie. In short, Satrapi demonstrated how the system marginalized children and affected their life by the drastic change in the educational system in Iran during the Cultural Revolution of 1979. In Persepolis, Satrapi also demonstrate how secularists, like her own parents, suffered and made sacrifices during and after the Islamic Revolution. For example, while it was a duty to wear a veil in public, Marjane and her mother refused to wear one at home. Satrapi specifically pointed this out in her novel to deepen the feeling that only at home, to a certain extent, they can be themselves. However, they took precautions; Marjane’s mother putted black curtains over the windows: ‘To protect us from our neighbours.’ ‘Across the street, they’re totally devoted to the new regime. A glimpse of what goes on in our house would be enough for them to denounce us!’ With this she meant the parties on Thursdays and the card games on Mondays that went on in their house and which were strictly forbidden. In that period, Marjane came to realize that her parents’ beliefs are opposite to those of the regime. Not only the parties, the deck of cards and not wearing the veil but also the intellectual books, the Western music and the use of alcohol at their home were banned by the Guards of the Revolution. The regime police this behaviour and execute such secularists. At one time, when the guardian threaten to search their apartment, Marjane even helped her mother flush the alcohol down the toilet. This all can be read in chapter ‘The Wine’. To conclude, Satrapi shows how the secularists are silenced within the text and also the sacrifices that they had to make.In summary, in the graphic novel Persepolis, Satrapi shows how Muslims including women, children and secularists were marginalized, excluded and silenced in Iran during the 1980s. As Marjane grew up as a Muslim during the Islamic Revolution in Iran, she repeatedly explores the theme of oppression to show the seriousness of the situation during that time. She does this through black and white drawings whereby black stands for the evil regime and white for the good secular modernists. The veil becomes a symbol of oppression which had a great impact on Satrapi’s life. She shows how children are marginalized by the drastic change in the educational system and demonstrate how secularists, like her own parents, suffered and made sacrifices.

x

Hi!
I'm Brenda!

Would you like to get a custom essay? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out